FAQ

Soothe n' bloom products faq

What do you mean by “native” and “sterile” plants?


A native plant is any plant that is indigenous to a given geographical region. Native plants provide vital ecosystem services, like absorbing carbon, providing food and habitat for insects, birds, and animals, and interacting with other native plants. With global import/export of plants and the popularity of picture-perfect gardens, the line between native and not has become exceptionally blurred. Many plants that might seem native because of their popularity are often in fact just the opposite. Many non-native plants are heavily advertised as “pest-free” for your garden. Pest free means that the plant is alien to the local wildlife and therefore does not play a part in the food web. This is what we mean by “sterile”. While pest-free may sound appealing, replacing native plants with sterile plants really means wiping out the food source for a local creature. Each instance creates a domino effect that reverberates up and down the food chain, eventually impacting every part of the nature around us. A garden devoid of insects may look pretty, but it is a depleted habitat in disguise. Given the state of the earth right now and the magnitude of suburban/urban development, it is crucial that our gardens, our personal pieces of nature, are truly in harmony with the habitats we’ve replaced. Curious about your garden? Search the names of your favorite featured plants online and see where they originate from. Next time you get to work in your garden, be sure to look up your regions native plants using the Native Plant Finder! You may be surprised how many beautiful (and environmentally impactful) plants and flowers you’re missing out on.




Where can I find more information on native plants, biodiversity loss statistics, conscious gardening, etc?


Here’s a list of some of our favorite resources! What to plant: Native Plant Finder, National Wildlife Federation Native Plants of Maryland: What, When and Where Why it matters: Book: Bringing Nature Home by Doug Tallamy Book: The Living Landscape by Rick Darke and Doug Tallamy The Insect Apocalypse Is Here State of The Birds, 2016 Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers Look for native nurseries and native garden clubs in your area!




What do you mean when you say "every purchase contributes" to the project?


We're so glad you asked! We understand that this wording may not be as clear-cut as other businesses who, say, donate a percentage of profits or plant a tree for each purchase. The reason we opted against these systems is not to pull the wool over your eyes; in fact, quite the opposite! We are so deeply passionate about the Conscious Garden Project, and we want to do as much as we possibly can to spread the impact. We originally intended to plant a flower for each purchase, but our research quickly showed us that we need to do more than just put flowers in the ground to really help our starved habitats. In order to build "conscious" native gardens, we work hard to locate, research, plan, carry out, and maintain extensive landscaping projects. In addition to carrying out the physical creation of the garden, we are also working to team up with communities to educate youths and adults on the meaning and importance of native gardening. Our intention is for the CGP to continually grow and evolve alongside our business. To be as transparent as possible: 100% of the profit that we realize from J&J products goes toward the following: development of the business, a fair and reasonable salary for the two of us (we currently have no employees), and funding the planning and creation of our gardens and community outreach projects. The Conscious Garden Project is not-for-profit. We are wholly committed to bettering the world around us, and intend to be a living example of the ethically-conscious, community-focused business we believe our world needs. Follow us on social media to see regular updates on our progress, and please reach out if you are interested in getting involved!





Frequently asked questions

What do you mean by “native” and “sterile” plants?


A native plant is any plant that is indigenous to a given geographical region. Native plants provide vital ecosystem services, like absorbing carbon, providing food and habitat for insects, birds, and animals, and interacting with other native plants. With global import/export of plants and the popularity of picture-perfect gardens, the line between native and not has become exceptionally blurred. Many plants that might seem native because of their popularity are often in fact just the opposite. Many non-native plants are heavily advertised as “pest-free” for your garden. Pest free means that the plant is alien to the local wildlife and therefore does not play a part in the food web. This is what we mean by “sterile”. While pest-free may sound appealing, replacing native plants with sterile plants really means wiping out the food source for a local creature. Each instance creates a domino effect that reverberates up and down the food chain, eventually impacting every part of the nature around us. A garden devoid of insects may look pretty, but it is a depleted habitat in disguise. Given the state of the earth right now and the magnitude of suburban/urban development, it is crucial that our gardens, our personal pieces of nature, are truly in harmony with the habitats we’ve replaced. Curious about your garden? Search the names of your favorite featured plants online and see where they originate from. Next time you get to work in your garden, be sure to look up your regions native plants using the Native Plant Finder! You may be surprised how many beautiful (and environmentally impactful) plants and flowers you’re missing out on.




Where can I find more information on native plants, biodiversity loss statistics, conscious gardening, etc?


Here’s a list of some of our favorite resources! What to plant: Native Plant Finder, National Wildlife Federation Native Plants of Maryland: What, When and Where Why it matters: Book: Bringing Nature Home by Doug Tallamy Book: The Living Landscape by Rick Darke and Doug Tallamy The Insect Apocalypse Is Here State of The Birds, 2016 Worldwide decline of the entomofauna: A review of its drivers Look for native nurseries and native garden clubs in your area!




What do you mean when you say "every purchase contributes" to the project?


We're so glad you asked! We understand that this wording may not be as clear-cut as other businesses who, say, donate a percentage of profits or plant a tree for each purchase. The reason we opted against these systems is not to pull the wool over your eyes; in fact, quite the opposite! We are so deeply passionate about the Conscious Garden Project, and we want to do as much as we possibly can to spread the impact. We originally intended to plant a flower for each purchase, but our research quickly showed us that we need to do more than just put flowers in the ground to really help our starved habitats. In order to build "conscious" native gardens, we work hard to locate, research, plan, carry out, and maintain extensive landscaping projects. In addition to carrying out the physical creation of the garden, we are also working to team up with communities to educate youths and adults on the meaning and importance of native gardening. Our intention is for the CGP to continually grow and evolve alongside our business. To be as transparent as possible: 100% of the profit that we realize from J&J products goes toward the following: development of the business, a fair and reasonable salary for the two of us (we currently have no employees), and funding the planning and creation of our gardens and community outreach projects. The Conscious Garden Project is not-for-profit. We are wholly committed to bettering the world around us, and intend to be a living example of the ethically-conscious, community-focused business we believe our world needs. Follow us on social media to see regular updates on our progress, and please reach out if you are interested in getting involved!